REED CITY — Reed City fell to Lakeview in Central State Activities Association soccer action Monday night 3-0.

Lakeview was up 2-0 at halftime.

“The second half we came out stronger,” Reed City coach Betty Kichak said. “We had shots on goal but didn’t make it through.”

Meanwhile, both teams were hungry for a CSAA win last Wednesday night, but a determined Kent City Eagles team put on a dramatic second-half flurry to upend the Coyotes 6-3 in boys soccer action.

Two days later, it was announced Kent City would forfeit the game for using an ineligible player.

The Coyotes built a 2-0 lead in the first 3:27 of the game and were up 3-0 by the halfway point of the opening half. It was a three-goal lead at halftime but Kichak could feel the momentum slipping away from her team.

Did it ever.

Kent City exploded for four goals in the first 11 minutes of the second half and added two more later.

Abe Angious scored 2:00 into the game and Quentin Kichak had scores at 3:27 and 17:53 for Reed City. But at halftime, Kent City became a different team.

“I got them fired up,” Kent City coach Ed Hilton said of the comeback. “We were working on it and hoping for it. We had a game earlier in the season against Oakridge where we came back from a 3-1 deficit in the second half.”

As for Reed City at the half, “we tried to get their heads back into the game,” Kichak said. “I could see momentum changing. We tried to get it back. It was the same kind of issue we had against Newaygo.”

Kent City’s explosion was led by Joshua Lee with two goals. Gavin Mead got the win in the net. Troy Giese had a strong first half in making key saves against the Eagles, who came back strong in the final 40 minutes.

But the discovering of the ineligible player would give Reed City the win.

“They’ve got it,” Kichak said of her team. “They just need to have it bad enough.”

Jacob Swales scored in the second half and the Reed City soccer team tied Scottville-Mason County Central 1-1 on Friday in non-league play.

In the MCC game, “they did well under the circumstances,” Kichak said, referring especially to the wet weather. “They knew what they had to do.”