Review: Can a THC Gravy Save Thanksgiving?

Inside Hook

One way to mellow out a potential Thanksgiving argument? Add a little cannabis to the menu. Specifically, Kiva’s THC-infused turkey gravy and a few cans of Cann’s Cranberry Sage “social tonic.”

These Cali-based brands are big names in the edible and beverage industry, so it’s no surprise that they’re creating products with a holiday theme. Kiva, best known for its chocolates and gummies, is currently offering a limited-edition, single-serve gravy pack that has 10mg of THC. Outside of the cannabis, this seems like a typical dry gravy package, full of food starch, chicken fat, onion, garlic and salt. The sample we received was packaged on Oct. 10 and is apparently good for about 11 months.

Cann’s Cranberry Sage, also a limited-time offering, is an all-natural offering featuring cranberry juice, agave nectar and sage, along with 2mg THC and 4mg CBD. Each “Cann” has only 35 calories. 

Before we go further — do not serve either of these products unless every single guest (21+) at your holiday soiree has stated they are OK with trying these. Also, make sure none of those people are driving. 

The two products are currently available as a bundle (although they’re sold out — check back for restocking), but I was fortunate enough to get samples earlier this month and test them out.

The good news? The combination of the gravy and a single can of Cranberry Sage provided an extremely chill vibe during my Friday night meal — and I say this as someone who is not a big fan of edibles. Since it wasn’t Thanksgiving yet, I used the gravy on a baked chicken breast, with a side of fries and green beans. 

The Cann beverage was legitimately refreshing and tasty — I’d even drink this sans any cannabis addition. The cranberry was tart but wasn’t overwhelming, and the sage added a nice and unexpected herbaceous element to an overall effervescent tipple. 

The gravy, however, ended up rather gelatinous, even after I frantically Googled “how to save your gravy” (which pretty much came back with “add more water and keep whisking”). I’m not 100% sure if it was my fault or the gravy’s inherent makeup that caused the issues. Flavorwise, it was a very mild and savory sauce and certainly not unappetizing (outside of the texture) — it was no better or worse than other store-bought gravy packs I’ve used in the past. 

Neither product exhibited any sort of cannabis “taste” profile. And they collectively but subtly enhanced a weekend dinner. I’d probably try the gravy again but entrust it to a better cook — or maybe hack it to add flavor and reduce unwanted texture. Cann, meanwhile? I’d honestly serve this year-round and make every day a slightly happier Thanksgiving celebration.

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