REED CITY — The weather was iffy last week when work crews converged on St. Paul Lutheran Church perched on a hill along 4 Mile Road just west of Reed City.

Perhaps it was prayer that kept storm clouds away while one crew clambered up the steep roof to replace a roof that had been battered by earlier storms this spring. Other workers prepared an area on the east side of the church for an addition that will house a couple of classrooms and a storage room.

Still others on the west side readied the ground in preparation of cement pouring for what will be a large room for adults to use for meetings and such. Pastor Dawn Pooley said that particular room “will have a living room atmosphere, and be an extension for the narthex, actually.”

It also will be used for special gatherings of, say, family members just before a wedding or perhaps a funeral.

In addition, the kitchen will have a double door added to serve as a weather-block, “and all these things are happening thanks to a gift that has been given to us,” she explained, adding that prior to this gift, one had been given five years earlier to pay off the mortgage.

“We’ve spent considerable time to really evaluate our needs,” she said. A lot of study and addressing the congregation went into the decision of what could be done, “and the decisions were made based on need and with prayer. We want to be good stewards.”

Pastor Pooley said that the fellowship hall will have a light that’s lit at night, one that will be taken out of another location and face so that people will be able to see it.

“We will put the one in the narthex into the fellowship hall, and it’s made of very old cut stained glass. Our first women’s group was involved in that, and both windows were brought here from the old church.” She noted it should be inspiring to see, and carry on the past into the present for the church.

As she recorded the progress on the various work projects on her camera, workers clambered back off the roof, cement pouring was put on hold, and the clouds continued to gather to the west, moving to the north. Puddles later along 4 Mile indicated that perhaps the workers had abandoned the day’s work at a most appropriate time.